Category

Leftovers

This is a recipe that is familiar to probably everybody: frittata. Or my version of it anyway. You can make frittata a bizillion different ways. It’s basically just vegetables, cheese and eggs cooked into a pie. It’s the ultimate user-upper of whatever you’ve got. I make mine in a baking dish in the oven, but I’ve seen a few different methods.

I used cherry tomatoes from my garden, but Romas are great as well… not so juicy. Slice or chop them, your choice. Same with the spuds. I also used warrigal greens instead of my usual spinach, which added a lovely flavour. The Dutch Cream potatoes are also a good choice for a frittata as they are the waxy type of spud, rather than the floury type.

Zucchini is great in a frittata… ah heck, anything is. Some people insist on adding ham or bacon. OK, then. Whatever. Anything goes!

I never make the same frittata twice, so this is just the way I made it last time.

Leftovers are also really great for lunch the next day.

Oven baked frittata

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Serves: 4 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • a slug of oil (olive, rice bran, whatever you fancy)
  • 1 leek, sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced or grated (or more!)
  • 1 large carrot, scrubbed and grated
  • 1 zucchini, grated
  • a few mushrooms, halved and sliced
  • 2 potatoes, scrubbed and chopped into 2cm chunks (or sliced)
  • 1 bunch warrigal greens, leaves removed and chopped
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1/2 bunch parsley, chopped
  • 1-2 cups tasty cheese, grated (or combine with a hard, sharp cheese as well)
  • 6 eggs, lightly beaten
  • a splash of milk
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 200ºC.
  2. Grease a baking dish (not too big).
  3. Boil the potato chunks in a saucepan until they’re at least half cooked to almost cooked, then drain well.
  4. While the spuds are boiling, gently heat your favourite frying pan.
  5. Once it’s at temperature, add the oil.
  6. Gently cook the leek and garlic in the oil for a few minutes until the leek goes soft. Don’t burn the garlic! Turn the heat down if it starts to brown. Add the mushrooms and grated carrot and zucchini and continue cooking for at least another 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. It should all be nicely soft and cooked down. Take it off the heat.
  7. While the spuds and leek mixture are cooking, boil the kettle.
  8. Put the warrigal greens in a large pot or bowl. After the kettle boils, pour the hot water over the the greens. Give it a bit of a swoosh around until the leaves are wilted and take on a rich colour. This should only take a couple of minutes, max. Drain well.
  9. Toss the leek mixture, potato chunks, warrigal greens, cherry tomatoes, cheese and parsley into the baking dish and carefully mix around a bit.
  10. Add the milk to the eggs and season with salt and pepper, then pour over everything in the baking dish.
  11. Bake for around 40 minutes. Check it at 30 minutes. Cooking time will vary according to the size, shape and thickness of your baking dish, so you’ll have to use your judgement. It should be nicely golden on top and firm but not dry in the middle.
  12. Let it stand for at least 5 minutes so it can set.
  13. Serve with a salad.
1 February, 2018 0 comment
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This recipe is more because I am dealing with a cucalanche at home. I never thought one plant could produce so much food. I can’t give them away.

This is incredibly quick and easy and very refreshing for lunch during summer. Ever since I discovered the chilled beetroot soup, I’m a huge fan of cold soups for lunch now.

In this, my first attempt, I added too much Dijon mustard. When my friend and local grower Kat (Luna Harvest) tasted it, she said I’d discovered the recipe for McDonald’s Big Mac special sauce. She loves it, although it definitely wasn’t what I was going for! But she was right… and after she said it, I could only taste the Big Macs of my youth when I ate this. Not so sure if I want to be reminded of that particular food experience.

Don’t let that put you off! I’ve adjusted the recipe below with that in mind. You might also like to add a little water, if you prefer it thinner. I only have a stick blender, so it’s quite chunky.

Chilled cucumber soup

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Serves: 6 Prep Time:

Ingredients

  • 2 large cucumbers (more if they're smaller), halved and seeded, chopped
  • 1-2 cups Greek yoghurt
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1/2 red onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1/3 cup dill
  • 1/4 cup flat leaf parsley
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • salt & pepper for seasoning

Instructions

  1. Put the cucumber, yoghurt, lemon juice, onion, garlic, dill, parsley and mustard in a blender or food processor and blend or process thoroughly.
  2. Pour into a bowl, season with salt & pepper, cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or overnight.
  3. To serve, ladle into bowls and garnish with a sprinkle of dill.

4 January, 2018 0 comment
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This recipe was shared with the LocalTable community by Kath, one of our subscribers. There was a generous bunch of beetroots in last week’s box, so if you’re still working your way through them, then definitely give this recipe a try.

It’s easy-as, although it needs some considerable cooking time, then a heap of chilling time, but it’s not complicated and is incredibly delicious. If you’re on the fence about beetroot, then try this soup! You’ll be a beet-lover after the first silky slurp.

Chilled beetroot soup

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Serves: 6 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 3 medium to large beetroots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 brown onion, chopped (or maybe try a leek)
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced or finely grated
  • 4 cups vegetable stock (or chicken stock)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon horseradish cream (or more)
  • small bunch chives, chopped
  • small quantity dill, chopped

Instructions

  1. Combine stock, beetroot, onion, carrot and garlic in a saucepan. Cover, bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer.
  2. Simmer for an hour, more if necessary, depending on how big or small you chopped the vegetables. Test now and then. The vegetables must be very tender.
  3. Cool in the saucepan for about 30 minutes.
  4. Purée in a blender or food processor in batches until completely smooth. You might like to mash it in the saucepan a bit first to make it easier to transfer to the blender. [ed: I use a stick blender in the saucepan itself… saves on the hassle and the washing up]
  5. Pour into a bowl, mix in the sugar and season with salt and pepper (if you wish, definitely a bit of salt).
  6. Cover and chill in the fridge until refreshingly cold, at least 4 hours or overnight.
  7. Put the sour cream into a bowl, add about 1 tablespoon of horseradish cream and mix well. Add more horseradish cream to taste, if you like. Chill the mixture in the fridge.
  8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls (it’s even better if you have time to chill the bowls for an hour as well), add a dollop of the sour cream mixture and top with equal amounts of chives and dill.
28 December, 2017 0 comment
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I started making this a couple of months ago and I now call it the “Magic Pudding” of soups. This recipe makes a large quantity and the leftovers seem to go on forever just by adding more water (or stock) when you reheat some.

I like it quite thick and stew-like, but you can adjust the soupiness to suit your preference with the amount of liquid you add. The amount of stock in this recipe should be the minimum you use.

I live in Moruya, so I use dried Borlotti beans and biodynamic pearl barley from The Rustic Pantry (what an awesome shop!). The biodynamic pearl barley is such a good price, you might as well get the good stuff. I don’t soak the Borlotti beans beforehand. They’ll cook in the soup.

And there’s no need to peel the spuds and carrots you get from LocalTable… they’re grown without industrial chemicals… so just give them a good scrub and leave the skin on.

The best thing about this recipe is you can chuck in any vegetables you like. Depending on what it is, just add it later in the cooking process. So, if you want to use zucchini, for example, add it about 15 minutes before serving.

This is a fantastic vegetarian meal. Very filling and delicious. Kid approval rating 4/5.

Kate

Vegetable and pearl barley minestrone

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Serves: 6 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 2 generous slugs of oil (olive, rice bran, whatever you fancy)
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed or finely grated
  • 1 leek, sliced
  • 2 potatoes (waxy, like Désirée or Dutch Cream), cut into chunks
  • 2 large carrots (or more if they're smaller!), cut into chunks
  • 3 celery stalks, cut into chunks
  • 300gm dried Borlotti beans (more, if you like)
  • 1 cup pearl barley
  • 2 generous dollops of tomato paste
  • 1 cup white wine (or alternative, see notes)
  • at least 2 litres vegetable stock (or chicken stock if you're not a vegetarian)
  • 1/2 bunch oregano, no stalks
  • 1 bunch parsley, roughly chopped

Instructions

  1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Add the onion, garlic and leek and cook for a few minutes until the onion looks soft and translucent. Don’t cook on a high heat! The sizzle should be gentle.
  3. Add the potato, carrot, celery and beans. Cook for a few more minutes until the vegetables are starting to soften.
  4. Add the pearl barley and tomato paste. Cook for another few minutes while stirring to get everything nicely coated.
  5. Add the wine (or substitute) and let that simmer and reduce for a few minutes. Keep stirring so the vegetables don’t stick to the saucepan.
  6. Add the stock, bring the saucepan to a simmer. Put the lid on and reduce the heat to as low as you can to maintain the simmer. Cook for around an hour and 20 minutes (more if the beans need longer). Stir it once in a while.
  7. Once the beans are tender, remove from the heat and stir through the herbs.
  8. Ladle into bowls. Serve with bread, if you like, but the pearl barley and potato are filling enough.

Notes

I don't drink, so I keep cheap dry sherry in the house for cooking instead of wine, as it doesn't go off in the pantry. I use about half the quantity of wine in any recipe. I really like it! You can also (apparently) substitute a half-half mixture of apple cider vinegar and water, but I haven't tried that yet.

6 December, 2017 0 comment
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