Category

Really Quick

After thinking I might not be able to source any cauliflower for LocalTable subscribers, turns out there’s actually loads of it available. Even though I do love my veggies super simple and I’m happy just to lightly boil or steam, it can all get a bit same-y, so I thought I’d give this growing trend of cauliflower rice a go.

It seems very popular with followers of the paleo diet, which is probably why I’ve steered away. I’m not a diet follower, me. Unless eating locally grown is considered a diet.

Anyhoo, I’m a convert! This was so incredibly easy and quick and it doesn’t even really need a recipe, because the variations for it are endless. Definitely going to do this more often.

This made a great lunch for me (with leftovers) and was almost as quick as making a toastie!

Cauliflower rice vegetable stir fry

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Serves: 4 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • slurp of rice bran oil (or peanut or any oil that is good for high temperatures)
  • drizzle of sesame oil
  • slurp of tamari (or soy or any stir fry sauce)
  • 1 chunk ginger, minced
  • 1 clove garlic (or more if you like), minced
  • chilli to taste (fresh or dried), finely chopped
  • 2 shallots, chopped (keep some aside for garnish)
  • 4 mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 capsicum, chopped
  • 1 head cauliflower, chopped
  • 4 handfuls of snowpea sprouts, optional

Instructions

  1. Whiz the cauliflower chunks in a food processor until they look like rice.
  2. Heat a wok over a high heat. When the wok is hot, pour in the rice bran oil.
  3. Add the ginger, garlic, chilli, shallots, mushrooms and capsium. Toss in the oil for a minute or two, taking care not to let anything burn or go soft.
  4. Throw in the cauliflower rice and toss.
  5. Drizzle over a small amount of sesame oil and add the tamari. Toss for a few more minutes.
  6. Divide into bowls and plonk the snowpea sprouts on top, if using.
  7. Serve with a few chopped shallots sprinkled over for a garnish.
12 May, 2018 0 comment
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Not a great fan of cabbage, me. But this Sugarloaf variety might just turn me around!

When Fraser from Flood & Drought came up with snake beans and Sugarloaf cabbage (as well as his consistently delicious carrots) for the boxes, I figured it was best to ask him what to do with them.

He sent me a photo of his dinner that night and a rough method. He’d used an Ottolenghi recipe as a guide. I then put a slight twist on it, because I had a couple of different ingredients available. You will probably put your own twist on this version, depending on what you have available.

That’s the right way to cook: ingredients first, recipe second. Don’t have an ingredient? Use something else! Just keep it simple and you can’t go wrong.

I reckon you can split this between 2 for a meal, or between 4 as a side dish. I lightly marinated and pan fried some steak to medium rare (actually got it right this time), sliced it and plonked it on top of the stir fry. Delish.

It’s also really quick. As Fraser said: the brown rice takes about 45 minutes to cook, but after that it’s only 10 minutes for the rest. You can put the rice on and go shower/shave/hang out the washing, so it’s essentially a 15 minute meal if you use black bean sauce from a jar. That gets my vote.

Stir fried snake beans and sugarloaf

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Serves: 2 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • generous slurp of rice bran oil (don't use olive oil, as it will burn and smoke)
  • 1 cup brown rice, cooked
  • 1/2 Sugarloaf cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 1 bunch snake beans, cut into 10cm lengths
  • 2 carrots, scrubbed and cut into thin 10cm strips
  • 1 clove garlic, minced (optional, the black bean sauce I used is garlic-y enough)
  • generous dollop of black bean sauce (get a good one)
  • 2 green onions, chopped for garnish (or coriander or anything you feel like)

Instructions

  1. Heat a wok. Make sure it’s HOT.
  2. Add the oil, swish it around.
  3. Working quickly, chuck in the rice, cabbage, beans and carrots and garlic if using. Keep it moving, keep it moving… stir, scrape, flip, mix.
  4. Plonk in the black bean sauce, keep stirring, scraping, flipping and mixing for a few minutes. Don’t let the cabbage lose its colour. If it’s starting to look grey, get the wok off the heat.
  5. Serve with a sprinkle of green onion on top.

Notes

I don't even have a wok. I used a big saucepan and it still came out great. Whatever you use, just make sure it's really hot. We're not after a gentle, slow sizzle here. It's quick and frenetic.

8 February, 2018 0 comment
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While peaches are sublime to eat as is, I thought I’d try to come up with something divinely sublime to do with a peach that was also quick and easy. The interwebs threw up some ideas and I threw in my own twist to come up with this.

It’s butter, it’s sugar, it’s about five different kinds of sweetness that combine to take the peach to new heights. And it’s so easy!

I use rapadura sugar instead of brown sugar. It’s basically unrefined brown sugar and it’s beautifully rich. I get mine from Rustic Pantry Wholefoods in Moruya.

Use whatever saucey or syrupy drizzly topping you like. I happened to have some maple syrup, so that’s what I used, but something like salted caramel sauce would be delicious… even chocolate, if you must.

Important: make sure the peaches are soft and ripe!

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Serves: 6 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 3 peaches (white or yellow flesh, whatever is in season), halved and seeded
  • 6 peach-stone-sized blobs of butter (don't use margarine)
  • 2 tablespoons of rapadura sugar (or just brown sugar)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ice cream (any flavour you like, make it fancy)
  • maple syrup for drizzling

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC.
  2. Place the halved peaches, cut side up, on a shallow heat-proof dish.
  3. Drop a blob of butter into each of the hollows left by the peach seed.
  4. Mix the sugar and cinnamon together and sprinkle over the peach halves.
  5. Bake for at least 15 minutes. The peaches should be soft, but not mushy.
  6. To serve, place each half in a bowl or dish, top with a scoop of ice cream (we happened to have boysenberry gelato), then drizzle with the maple syrup. It won’t look too pretty, but it will taste amazing.
11 January, 2018 0 comment
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This recipe is more because I am dealing with a cucalanche at home. I never thought one plant could produce so much food. I can’t give them away.

This is incredibly quick and easy and very refreshing for lunch during summer. Ever since I discovered the chilled beetroot soup, I’m a huge fan of cold soups for lunch now.

In this, my first attempt, I added too much Dijon mustard. When my friend and local grower Kat (Luna Harvest) tasted it, she said I’d discovered the recipe for McDonald’s Big Mac special sauce. She loves it, although it definitely wasn’t what I was going for! But she was right… and after she said it, I could only taste the Big Macs of my youth when I ate this. Not so sure if I want to be reminded of that particular food experience.

Don’t let that put you off! I’ve adjusted the recipe below with that in mind. You might also like to add a little water, if you prefer it thinner. I only have a stick blender, so it’s quite chunky.

Chilled cucumber soup

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Serves: 6 Prep Time:

Ingredients

  • 2 large cucumbers (more if they're smaller), halved and seeded, chopped
  • 1-2 cups Greek yoghurt
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 1/2 red onion, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1/3 cup dill
  • 1/4 cup flat leaf parsley
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • salt & pepper for seasoning

Instructions

  1. Put the cucumber, yoghurt, lemon juice, onion, garlic, dill, parsley and mustard in a blender or food processor and blend or process thoroughly.
  2. Pour into a bowl, season with salt & pepper, cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or overnight.
  3. To serve, ladle into bowls and garnish with a sprinkle of dill.

4 January, 2018 0 comment
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Another food from my childhood, but this time it brings good memories.

Mum grew heaps of rhubarb in her garden, so there was a pretty steady supply of stewed rhubarb in the fridge. Super quick and easy to make, she just chucked in some sugar and let it cook down.

But I’ve picked up a couple of tips over the years that make this stewed rhubarb better than my mum’s (sorry Mum), like using raw sugar instead of white or caster and squeezing in some lemon juice. Very more-ish. Fantastic with ice cream or on muesli or porridge.

Kate

Stewed rhubarb

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Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch of rhubarb
  • 2/3 cup raw sugar
  • half a lemon (or a whole, if it's not very juicy)
  • half a cinnamon stick

Instructions

  1. Cut rhubarb into chunks and rinse.
  2. Chuck the wet rhubarb chunks into a medium saucepan on a low heat.
  3. Add the raw sugar.
  4. Squeeze the lemon juice into the saucepan.
  5. Add the cinnamon stick and give it a good mix.
  6. Cook over a low heat until it goes all stewy. The rhubarb chunks will fall apart and go stringy. Stir regularly. It doesn’t take very long, so don’t forget about it.
  7. Set a timer for 10 minutes if you’re like me and wander away from the stove a lot. Cleaning boiled-over stewed rhubarb residue off your stove is annoying. Check after 10 minutes and keep cooking according to how you like it.
  8. The longer you cook it, the more gooey and toffee-like it becomes (good for eating with ice cream), but don’t let it go too far, or it gets a slightly burnt taste. Keep it runnier for slopping onto your breakfast cereal.
6 December, 2017 0 comment
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I grew up hating asparagus. My parents used to eat it on a plate of salad FROM A TIN. It smelt horrible and tasted worse. I swore I’d never eat it. Then one night, as an adult, I was a guest at someone’s house and they proudly announced they were serving asparagus for entrée. I gulped and steeled myself to eat what they gave me – I didn’t want to be one of “those” guests.

What I ate was not asparagus as I knew it. It was something divine and this has remained my favourite way to eat it ever since.

Finger licking!
Kate

Simple sautéed asparagus

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Serves: 2 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • a generous blob of butter (don't hold back)
  • 1 bunch of asparagus
  • half a lime (or a whole, if it's not very juicy)
  • a sprinkling of finely grated parmesan or pecorino cheese
  • cracked pepper

Instructions

  1. Trim off the ends of the asparagus. Where you cut depends on how thick the spears are and how woody they are. Try flexing a spear to get an idea of where the deliciousness stops and the woody bit starts.
  2. Gently heat your favourite frying pan.
  3. Once it’s at temperature, throw in the butter. It should quietly sizzle and not smoke or go brown. If it does, turn it down, clean the pan and start again! Don’t burn the butter!
  4. Chuck the spears in the melted butter and gently sautée. Keep the spears moving so they don’t brown. Jiggle the pan or roll them around with a spoon or tongs.
  5. Give them between 5 to 10 minutes. You’ll judge this best yourself. It depends on your pan, the type of heat, the thickness of the spears. You want them to have a lovely rich green colour, but don’t let them overcook.
  6. Squeeze the lime over them while they’re still in the pan. Give them another jiggle and a swizzle.
  7. Tip the spears onto a lovely white serving dish, butter an’ juice an’ all.
  8. Sprinkle with cheese and crack some pepper over the top.
  9. Eat with your fingers.
  10. Wipe your chin when you’re done.
30 November, 2017 0 comment
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