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Spring

Oh my gosh beetroot. Beetroot beetroot beetroot come on summer because all this beetroot is making me want those tomatoes, cucumbers, beans and aaaall that marvellous variety soooo much.

How lucky am I to have Kat helping me with recipes this time around? Soooo lucky, because I never would have come up with this recipe or had the time to make it as the recipe for the week.

These things were a-m-a-z-i-n-g. There’s more prep involved, but seriously, you need to make them. Things are going to get purple in your kitchen making this. Embrace it.

Beetroot burgers with broad bean and parsley hummus

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Serves: 6 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 2 x 400gm cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained (or soak dried ones, if you prefer)
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/4 cup tahini
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 100gm broad beans, podded, blanched and skins removed
  • 1/2 cup parsley, roughly chopped
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin
  • a little water
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 raw beetroots, peeled and grated
  • 2 carrots, scrubbed and grated
  • a few cabbage leaves, finely shredded
  • a couple of chard leaves, finely shredded
  • 100g porridge oats
  • 3 tablespoons tahini
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1 spring onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 bunch coriander, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

Start with the hummus.

  1. Place 1 can of chickpeas, the garlic, half the tahini, the broad beans, parsley, lemon juice and cumin in a food processor and pulse to combine.
  2. Slowly add about half of the olive oil while the processor is running.
  3. Add small amounts of water until you reach the desired consistency. Set aside.

Then do the burgers.

  1. Heat a sploosh of the oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Don’t let the oil smoke. Sautée the onion and garlic for about 5 minutes, or until soft.
  2. Add the grated beetroot and carrot, shredded cabbage and chard and cook for another 5 minutes, or until soft. Drain away any excess liquid released by the vegetables. TIP: if you put the grated beetroot in a container lined with paper towel for 10 minutes, it will greatly reduce the liquid during cooking.
  3. Put the oats, other can of chickpeas, tahini and egg yolks in a food processor and pulse to combine.
  4. Tip the mixture into a bowl and mix in the sautéed vegetable mix and the coriander. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Divide the mixture into six portions and shape into burgers. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.
  6. Heat the rest of the oil in a frying pan over a medium heat. Cook the burgers, in batches if necessary, for 2–3 minutes on each side, or until golden and hot through.
  7. Serve on lightly toasted sourdough buns, starting with a generous layer of hummus with the burger plonked on top. Dress with anything you like.
15 November, 2018 0 comment
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Coriander. My, how people love to argue about coriander. I kinda have a foot in both camps. The first time I ever ate it, I didn’t have a very good experience. It was at a Thai restaurant during the 80s and I don’t know what the deal was, but something left the most god-awful taste in my mouth and I couldn’t seem to get rid of it and my gum felt like I’d been stabbed with something ghastly and I blamed the coriander and that was it.

Then I grew up and found that — mostly — I really liked it, but only in small doses and as far as I could work out, I was OK with the leaves, but dubious about the roots. The smell, though! Wow!! It’s fabulous!!

There’s been a lot of coriander so far this LocalTable season, so I feel for any subscribers who have been horrified each time they opened the box to find some. So please trust me when I say this recipe is a great tasting way to eat coriander and it will use it all up in one go.

If you end up with any leftover pesto, keep it in a jar or container in the fridge with a layer of olive oil over it to stop it going brown.

The quantities given for each ingredient are pretty arbitrary. This really is a dish that you just make how you like it. Don’t add the lemon juice or oil all at once. Add them both bit by bit until it has the taste and consistency that you like. I prefer less oily, so I take the steady-as-she-goes approach. The best thing about this recipe is, it’s super quick and there’s no cooking!! Well, not really.

This recipe stirs the pesto through pasta, but it also makes a great dip. Eat it any old how. If you’re not a coriander fan, I reckon this will win you over. I love it and I’m not a coriander freak by any means.

If you’ve been avoiding it, try just chopping some into a salad. Use a small amount at first and see how you go. Coriander really is fantastically good for you. Eat it!

Coriander pesto

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Serves: 4 Prep Time:

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch coriander
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • chili to taste (optional)
  • 200ml extra virgin olive oil (or more or less, according to your preference)
  • 100gm macadamia nuts
  • juice of half a lemon (or more)
  • salt to taste

Instructions

  1. Over a high heat, toast the macadamia nuts in a dry frying pan. Keep them moving almost constantly so they don’t burn.
  2. Blend the nuts, garlic and chili in a food processor (or whatever you’ve got to do the job) until they’re finely chopped.
  3. Pour in some oil and lemon juice, add the coriander and keep blending. Add more oil and lemon juice as you go until it has the balance of flavours and consistency that you like.
  4. Season with some salt and blend once more.
  5. Serve it stirred through some pasta with a lemon wedge on the side to add more zing if you want it, or as a dip. Or any way you feel like eating it.
8 November, 2018 3 comments
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I’ve always liked beetroot, but beetroot for me growing up was out of a tin. I think beetroot is one of the few vegetables that is actually not too bad out of a tin. It’s pretty close to homecooked beetroot (unlike, say, tinned asparagus, which bears no relation to homecooked asparagus whatsoever). But I’ve been slow to get more fresh beetroot into my cooking and I’m not sure why that is.

Because of that, a bunch of beetroot can last me ages — lucky it stores so well — but now that I’m eating more seasonally, I find that at this time of year, beetroot is one of the main vegetables available so I’m cooking and eating it a lot more. Maybe I’ve hesitated because of the time it takes to cook, but that’s a bit silly now I think about it. All I’ve had to do is plan a tiny bit more and throw some in the oven about an hour before I start to make dinner. As someone who isn’t particularly into cooking, this simple change in thinking has been a small epiphany for me. If I couldn’t be home early enough to get it into the oven in time, I’ve cooked it in the morning, or the day before. It’s revelational, I tell you!

This is one small example of how eating locally grown food can influence how you cook and eat. I don’t think I’ll ever be super into cooking, but just by making this small change, I’ve increased the repertoire of flavours on my family’s plates, I’m exposing my kids to new meals and I’ve supported the local food system by eating what it’s producing.

So, eat more beetroot!

Also: juicing raw beetroot with some other veg and an apple is amazing.

Chard & roasted beetroot salad

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Serves: 2 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 3 or 4 beetroots, peeled, cut into sizeable chunks (not too small)
  • 1/2 bunch chard, shredded, no stems
  • roughly same amount of mixed salad leaves
  • 1/2 cup pistachios, shelled
  • 1/2 cup seed mix (we used sunflower, pumpkin and linseed)
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar (spend the money to get the real stuff)
  • juice of half an orange
  • 1/2 punnet microgreens

Instructions

Start with the beetroot (this can be done well ahead, if preferred)

  1. Preheat oven to about 170deg.
  2. Place in a shallow baking tray and liberally douse with olive oil. Make sure the pieces are fully covered with oil and not touching each other.
  3. Season with salt and pepper, if you like.
  4. Roast for about 30 minutes, but use your own judgement. Check from time to time until they are as firm or soft as you like.
  5. Remove from the oven and let cool.
  6. While the beetroot is in the oven, lightly toast the pistachios and seed mix in a dry frying pan (no oil) over a low heat.
  7. Combine all the ingredients in a bowl, pour over the vinegar and juice, toss and serve.
  8. Sprinkle with microgreens.

Notes

This recipe will make enough for 2 if eating it as a meal, or 4 if as a side dish.

1 November, 2018 0 comment
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I said a few weeks ago we should start inventing names for dishes and this week we have. It wasn’t intentional, more like a spontaneous exclamation after Kat’s first mouthful.

Kat came up with this fabulous hybrid of a recipe that also substituted some of the huge quantities of sugar with honey.

It was a bit of a gamble, but — oh my — did it pay off! It was a bit gooey for a first attempt at honey substitution, so we’ve adjusted the recipe slightly from what she did to hopefully get an even better result.

Rhubarb & mandarin honey heaven

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Serves: 4 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch rhubarb, chopped
  • 1 cup honey
  • 1/2 tablespoon baking soda
  • 5 tablespoons tapioca
  • 3 mandarins, peeled, segmented
  • 1 cup rapadura (or brown) sugar, well packed
  • 1 cup quick cooking oats
  • 1/2 cup plain flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 125gm cup butter in small chunks

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 160º.
  2. In a large bowl, mix the rhubarb, honey, baking soda and tapioca. Let stand for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Tip into a greased loaf tin or rectangular baking dish. Really, just use a dish that you think will work.
  4. Halve the mandarin segments lengthwise and remove the seeds, then layer them on top of the rhubarb mixture.
  5. Combine the rapadura sugar, oats, flour and salt in a large bowl, then rub in the butter until the mix becomes crumbly.
  6. Sprinkle the crumb mixture over the rhubarb and mandarins.
  7. Bake for about 30 minutes, but the time will really depend on the type of dish you use, so check it regularly and use your judgement.
  8. It will be pretty soft and gooey when it comes out of the oven, so let it cool for around 20 minutes to let the honey set.
  9. Serve while it’s still warm with ice cream.
26 October, 2018 0 comment
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One of the best things about spring is broad beans. They’re only around for a short time, but broadies are worth the wait for their flavour and versatility.

Most people I know love to make falafel with broad beans and with good reason, but we’ve decided to share a recipe for a fritter that uses a few other ingredients in this week’s box.

These were a real hit with the small humans as well.

Broad bean & potato fritters

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Serves: 4 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 1/2 teaspoon each whole cumin, coriander and fennel seeds
  • 3-4 mushrooms, roughly chopped
  • 6 asparagus spears, chopped into small pieces
  • 1/2 mild chili, deseeded and chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced or grated
  • 2 medium potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 350gm broad beans, shelled
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder
  • 3 tablespoons fresh coriander, chopped
  • 40gm breadcrumbs
  • 1 egg
  • 50gm plain flour
  • 1 cup yoghurt
  • 2 tablespoons mint, chopped
  • 1/4 cup rice bran (or sunflower) oil for cooking fritters
  • squeeze of lemon

Instructions

  1. Put the seeds in a shallow pan and gently dry-roast until fragrant, then grind in a mortar & pestle or spice blender.
  2. Melt some butter in a frying pan and lightly sautée the mushroom, asparagus, chili and garlic and set aside.
  3. Boil the potatoes in salted water for five minutes, then add the broad beans and simmer for a further eight minutes.
  4. Drain, transfer potatoes and beans to a bowl and add the ground spices, sautéed mushroom mix, turmeric, two tablespoons of olive oil, salt and pepper, then mash roughly.
  5. Mix in the coriander, breadcrumbs and egg.
  6. Shape handfuls into patties, coat in flour and chill in the fridge for half an hour. Makes about 12 fritters.
  7. While the patties are chilling, mix the mint with the yoghurt and keep cool.
  8. Gently heat the rice bran oil in a frying pan and cook the fritters on a medium to high heat until golden brown on each side.
  9. Squeeze some lemon over the fritters just before serving with the minty yoghurt and a fresh salad.
25 October, 2018 0 comment
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We should give this salad a name, because that description is a bit unwieldy. I might ask Kat to do that the next time she invents a recipe.

It’s still spring, it’s still the hungry gap, so this week it’s another salad. And I’m betting subscribers have still got beetroot from last week’s box loitering in the fridge, so we’ve thrown some of that in, roasted. The challenge ingredient this week is the grapefruit and I have to say, I think Kat has nailed it with this recipe.

My grandmother used to share a grapefruit with my grandfather every morning. Plucked off their e-n-o-r-m-o-u-s tree in the backyard. They halved it, smothered it with sugar and honey, extracted it with a weird little serrated, curved knife and ate it as is. I was not a fan. But this… this more like it.

Some people find grapefruit quite strong. If that’s you, then dial down the amounts suggested in the recipe. We’ve used 2 grapefruits in this recipe, so small box subscribers will need to halve everything.

There will be leftover vinaigrette. Just keep it in the fridge and use it for your next salad.

Quinoa salad with beetroot, microgreens and grapefruit vinaigrette

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Serves: 4 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 to 2 cups quinoa (1 cup = 3 cups cooked), well rinsed and drained (removes any bitterness)
  • 1 grapefruit, cut into small wedges, skin removed
  • sprinkle of rapadura (brown) sugar
  • 1/2 to 1 bag of mixed salad leaves, lightly chopped
  • small bunch coriander, chopped
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • 4 small whole beetroots, scrubbed
  • 1/2 to 1 punnet microgreens
  • 1 clove garlic, minced or grated
  • 2/3 cup olive oil
  • juice of 1 grapefruit
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • salt and pepper to season

Instructions

Start with the beetroot (this can be done well ahead, if preferred)

  1. Preheat oven to about 170deg.
  2. Don’t top and tail them, just trim the leaves and stems leaving a stubby bit and pull all the hairy bits off the bottom.
  3. Rub with olive oil.
  4. Place upside down (using the stubby bit like a plinth) on a baking tray.
  5. Cook for about an hour, but this will depend on the size of the beetroot. These were fairly small.
  6. When cooked to soft but still firm, let cool, then remove skins, top and tail, and slice into strips.

While the beetroot is in the oven, cook the quinoa:

  1. Put the rinsed and drained quinoa into a saucepan with twice the quantity of water.
  2. Over medium heat, bring to a boil, then with the saucepan lid off, reduce to a gentle simmer.
  3. Once the water has been absorbed by the quinoa (keep an eye on it), remove the pan from the stove, cover and let it steam for 5 minutes. Remove the lid and let it cool.

While the beetroot and quinoa are cooking, make the vinaigrette:

  1. Combine the garlic, olive oil, grapefruit juice, mustard, vinegar and honey in a jar and shake well. The trick is to find the right balance between the grapefruit and the vinegar, so try adding them incrementally to suit your taste.
  2. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

When you’ve done that, grill the grapefruit:

  1. Heat a griddle or frying pan to a medium heat and add a small amount of olive oil. Don’t let the oil smoke. If it smokes, it’s too hot. Turn it down, wipe the pan and start again.
  2. Grill the grapefruit wedges until they’re soft, but not shrivelling.
  3. Take them off the heat and sprinkle with the sugar, then let them cool.

Put it all together:

  1. In a large bowl, combine the cooked quinoa, grilled grapefruit, mixed salad leaves, coriander and green onions. Before adding the beetroot, pour over some vinaigrette and gently toss. Start with a small amount and keep adding as you toss until you get it to your taste.
  2. Then add the beetroot, to avoid turning everything pink.
  3. Liberally sprinkle with microgreens, gently toss again and serve
11 October, 2018 0 comment
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The first recipe for the new LocalTable season is a great dish for spring. Everything in it is an expression of this season and it’s a salad, so it’s perfect for the changeable weather at this time of year.

You could also sautée some leek together with the mushroom, let it cool and add it to the salad, but this version is a super quick, light meal with almost no cooking. Add some more nuts or even some tofu to give it some more oomph, but it really doesn’t call for meat.

The dressing is what makes it. Light and delicious. Start with just a little and add only as much as your taste prefers. Keep any leftover in the fridge and add it to pretty much anything.

Cabbage and rice noodle salad

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Serves: 4 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • half cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 3 or 4 carrots, scrubbed and grated
  • 4-6 mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • bunch coriander, roughly chopped
  • 1 packet vermicelli rice noodles
  • sprinkle of cashews (or peanuts)
  • 1/4 cup tamari (or soy) sauce
  • 1/3 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1-2 tablespoons honey, to taste

Instructions

  1. Boil some water in a saucepan and cook the rice noodles.
  2. Rinse in cold water to cool and drain well.
  3. Throw the cabbage, carrots, mushrooms, green onions and coriander into a bowl and mix.
  4. Pour the tamari, vinegar, sesame and olive oils and the honey into a jar and shake well.
  5. Turn the noodles into another bowl and mix in a little of the dressing to lubricate. You can let it soak for a few minutes, if you like. It’s good to cut the noodles up a bit too (not too short!).
  6. Gently mix the noodles into the salad.
  7. Pour in as much dressing as you like, gently mixing as you go.
  8. Serve with a sprinkle of nuts on top.
4 October, 2018 0 comment
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Sometimes you end up with veggies languishing in the bottom of the fridge crisper. It’s a part of life for most of us. When you participate in the community supported agriculture model, there’s no doubt that, unless you’re a dedicated vegetarian, food can start to build up.

That’s not so much a problem with locally grown food, because it stores for a hecking long time, but yep, there can be times when some of it gets past its prime. So what to do with it?

Definitely don’t throw it out. In fact, you don’t even have to compost it. Not straight away, anyway.

Make your own vegetable stock! It’s probably the easiest thing to do ever, each batch brings its own character to your dishes and — best of all — no additives, no powdered this or emulsified that. Just veggies.

Some great advice I read is to not just chuck out the bits of veg that you chop off as you cook, but keep them in a bag in the fridge until it’s full, then make stock from that! Great idea! You can still chuck the veg in the compost after you’ve made stock from it. No waste plus you’re getting even more value from the food.

Veggies good for making stock: onions, leeks including the tops, carrots, celery including the leaves, fennel including the tops, mushrooms including the stalks, parsnips… that sort of stuff.

Veggies NOT good for making stock: zucchini, potatoes, turnips, broccoli, beans, beetroot… that sort of stuff. They’ll overpower the flavour, or might make it cloudy, and some add an unwanted bitterness.

You can add garlic or spices or even salt to the stock, if you like, but I prefer to have the option of adding those extras when I cook the meal itself.

Vegetable stock

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Serves: 10 cups Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • odds and ends of suitable vegetables, in roughly equal quantities
  • 1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2.5 litres water

Instructions

  1. Rinse and chop the vegetables into large chunks and plonk them in a large soup pot.
  2. Let the vegetables sweat on a low heat for about 10 minutes, just in the residual water from rinsing. Stir them a few times.
  3. Add the water, peppercorns and bay leaf and increase the heat to bring to a low boil.
  4. When it reaches boiling, reduce the heat to a very low simmer.
  5. Leave it just at boiling point for at least an hour, occasionally stirring gently.
  6. Remove it from the heat and strain the vegetables through a colander, catching the stock in another pot or bowl.
  7. Let it cool a little, then strain the stock once more through some cheesecloth or a clean cotton/linen tea towel.
  8. Once its completely cool, freeze the stock in useful portions (I had a bunch of jars that hold 1 cup, so I used those).
11 June, 2018 0 comment
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This recipe was shared with the LocalTable community by Kath, one of our subscribers. There was a generous bunch of beetroots in last week’s box, so if you’re still working your way through them, then definitely give this recipe a try.

It’s easy-as, although it needs some considerable cooking time, then a heap of chilling time, but it’s not complicated and is incredibly delicious. If you’re on the fence about beetroot, then try this soup! You’ll be a beet-lover after the first silky slurp.

Chilled beetroot soup

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Serves: 6 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 3 medium to large beetroots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 brown onion, chopped (or maybe try a leek)
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced or finely grated
  • 4 cups vegetable stock (or chicken stock)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 tablespoon horseradish cream (or more)
  • small bunch chives, chopped
  • small quantity dill, chopped

Instructions

  1. Combine stock, beetroot, onion, carrot and garlic in a saucepan. Cover, bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer.
  2. Simmer for an hour, more if necessary, depending on how big or small you chopped the vegetables. Test now and then. The vegetables must be very tender.
  3. Cool in the saucepan for about 30 minutes.
  4. Purée in a blender or food processor in batches until completely smooth. You might like to mash it in the saucepan a bit first to make it easier to transfer to the blender. [ed: I use a stick blender in the saucepan itself… saves on the hassle and the washing up]
  5. Pour into a bowl, mix in the sugar and season with salt and pepper (if you wish, definitely a bit of salt).
  6. Cover and chill in the fridge until refreshingly cold, at least 4 hours or overnight.
  7. Put the sour cream into a bowl, add about 1 tablespoon of horseradish cream and mix well. Add more horseradish cream to taste, if you like. Chill the mixture in the fridge.
  8. To serve, ladle the soup into bowls (it’s even better if you have time to chill the bowls for an hour as well), add a dollop of the sour cream mixture and top with equal amounts of chives and dill.
28 December, 2017 0 comment
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Silverbeet, spinach, chard… whatever you want to call it… it takes up a lot of space until you cook it.

At the risk of boring you with another of my childhood food stories, my mother (love you, Mum!) used to boil the crap out of it in very salty water, then put a mug of “spinach water” on the table at dinner, from which we all had to drink some. Looking back, I’m like “What the? Why didn’t you just blanch it and we could eat the nutrients instead of drinking the salty-as water they leached into?” Hey, we do what we know, right?

Which is why I didn’t eat silverbeet for many years after I left home. Then I discovered it only needs the teeensiest bit of cooking and it tastes superb! Especially without the gobs of salt (really love you, Mum!). So now I’ll eat it any old how, but in pies is my favourite. You can even eat it raw. You might be surprised what vegetables you can eat raw. Almost anything leafy, also corn, asparagus for example… even Brussels sprouts, so be warned.

I’ve tried a few different spinach pie incarnations, but this one is my favourite so far. Because easy. I’ve never quite got the pastry to puff up how I’d like, but it still tastes great.

Use whatever cheeses you like. I was going to add in some blue, but I’m saving it for Christmas. Some people like ricotta (not a real cheese)… I’m not such a fan. Just use your favourites.

Lazy spinach pie

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Serves: 4 Prep Time: Cooking Time:

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch spinach/silverbeet/chard, roughly chopped
  • a generous blob of butter (don't hold back)
  • 1 leek sliced (soft white part)
  • 1 garlic clove (or more, if you like), minced or finely grated
  • 3 or 4 medium sized mushrooms, chopped (don't use the little ones, they have no flavour)
  • 1-1 1/2 cups grated tasty cheese, or cheddar, or cottage cheese (pretty much whatever cheese you like)
  • 1/4 cup parmesan or pecorino (Tilba Dairy make a good one), finely grated
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg, finely ground (grind your own, tastes so much better)
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten (retain a small amount to brush onto the top of the pie)
  • 1 sheet puff pastry, defrosted
  • dusting of flour for benchtop

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200ºC.
  2. Boil the kettle.
  3. Put the spinach in a large pot or bowl. After the kettle boils, pour the hot water over the spinach. Give it a bit of a swoosh around until the leaves are wilted and take on a rich colour. This should only take a couple of minutes, max. Strain the spinach and rinse in cold water. Let it drain.
  4. Gently heat your favourite frying pan.
  5. Once it’s at temperature, throw in the butter. It should quietly sizzle and not smoke or go brown. If it does, turn it down, clean the pan and start again! Don’t burn the butter!
  6. Gently cook the leek and garlic for a few minutes until the leek goes soft. Don’t burn the garlic! Turn the heat down if it starts to brown. Add the mushrooms and continue cooking for at least another 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. It should all be nicely soft and cooked down.
  7. While the leek mixture is cooking, put the cheeses, nutmeg, salt, pepper and most of the beaten eggs in a bowl. Give that a mix.
  8. Add the drained spinach. You need to get as much water out of it as possible. Squeeze handfuls of spinach to do this. Really give it a good squeeze. It’s ok, it’s going in a pie.
  9. Then add the leek mixture and give it all a good stir to combine. Maybe let it cool a bit first, while you sort out the pastry.
  10. Dust the flour over a clean benchtop. Give the pastry sheet a bit of a roll, just to stretch it out a bit. I use a 23cm pie dish and the pastry sheet is about 25cm. I could probably use the pastry sheet without rolling it, but I do it anyway, just to give me that bit extra to work with.
  11. Place the pastry sheet over the pie dish. Don’t worry too much about shaping it into the dish and DO NOT trim the edges.
  12. Tip the spinach mixture into the pie dish. Then – here’s the good bit – fold the corners of the pastry into the middle to form the top of the pie. Oh my lordy, it’s so easy, you won’t believe it. Don’t worry if the corners don’t meet exactly or if there’s a gap.
  13. Brush the top with the remaining beaten egg.
  14. Cook in the oven for 30 minutes.
  15. Let it cool on the bench for 5 minutes to set, then serve with a salad of whatever you’ve got.
21 December, 2017 0 comment
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